How to master Firefly and Insect pose


Firefly and Insect pose are both arm balance poses that requires more core strength than arm strength. The physical comparisons between firefly pose and the insect’s pose are pretty easy to see. The steps are the exact same, except in Firefly, the last step is to straighten the legs. Lets look at these steps below.

a girl performing the Insect pose in yoga
Insect Pose


Insect pose

  1.  Squat with your feet a little less than shoulder distance apart. Tilt your pelvis forward and bring your trunk between your legs. Keeping your trunk low, straighten your legs enough to lift your pelvis to about knee height.
  2. Bring your left upper arm and shoulder as far as possible underneath the back of your left thigh just above the knee and place your left hand on the floor at the outside edge of your foot, fingers pointing forward. Repeat these actions on the other side.
  3. Lift yourself off the floor by carefully shifting your center of gravity. Press your hands into the floor and slowly begin to rock your weight back, off your feet and onto your hands. Keep your inner thighs as high on your arms as possible.
  4. Press through the bases of your big toes but pull your toes back toward your torso and spread them apart. The inner edges of your feet should be angled slightly forward, the outer edges slightly back.
  5. Straighten your arms as much as possible. Hollow your chest as you widen your shoulder blades as much as possible; this will round your upper back, which will lift your torso higher.
  6. Without tensing your neck, lift your head and gaze forward. Breathe slowly and hold the pose for 15 seconds or longer, then release your feet to the floor with an exhale.
a girl performing the Firefly pose in yoga
Firefly Pose

Firefly pose

While in the Insect pose, you may feel that this pose relies heavily on arm and shoulder strength. You would be completely right. The moment you switch into Firefly though, this fires up the lower abs and leg muscles. Your whole core will tense in an attempt to move the lower half of the body independently while balanced on your arms. Loose hamstrings, flexors and quads make the leg extension easier, thereby helping take some of the pressure off your core.

Benefits

  1. Stretches the inner groins and the back of the torso
  2. Strengthens the arms and wrists
  3. Tones the belly
  4. Improves sense of balance
  5. Tones the major leg muscles

Caution

 People suffering from shoulder, elbow, wrist and lower back injuries should avoid this pose.